Hubble Space Telescope Down

The Hubble Space Telescope, which has been peering into the cosmos for more than 30 years, was offline for a few days, NASA reported Friday. The problem, according to NASA, stems from a payload computer that stopped working on Sunday. According to the statement, the telescopes and their research instruments are "in good health."

Hubble Space Telescope Down

The payload computer's role is to "control, coordinate, and monitor the science instruments for health and safety reasons," according to NASA. On Monday, an attempt to restart it failed. As per NASA, the early signs pointed to a failed computer memory module as the source of the problem. A switch to a backup memory module had the same result.

The payload computer's technology stems from the 1980s and was replaced in 2009 as part of routine maintenance. The Hubble Space Telescope, which was launched in 1990 and transmitted back photos of the solar system, Milky Way, and distant galaxies, revolutionized astronomy and transformed our perception of the universe.

The Hubble Space Telescope, which will be launched later this year, will be a new and more powerful version. It's built to look further into space than ever before.

It said that the Hubble Space Telescope was out of commission for the fourth day on Wednesday due to computer issues. Due to technological concerns, all astronomical gazing has come to a halt, and the observatory has been rendered inactive.

The computer in question is from the 1980s and is in charge of controlling the telescope's science gear. According to the Associated Press, it shut down on Sunday, with a broken memory being cited as a likely explanation.

On Monday, flight controllers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland attempted but failed to reboot the computer. They're in the midst of switching to a backup memory unit, and if all goes well, they'll give the telescope a test day before turning on the science instruments and continuing with astronomical viewing.

Despite a series of repairs and updates by spacewalking astronauts during NASA's shuttle era, Hubble, which was launched in 1990, is showing signs of aging. The idled computer was placed during NASA's fifth and final repair call in 2009 when the Hubble Telescope was put back into safe mode due to an unexplained issue.

On March 8, one of NASA's most valuable assets, the Hubble Space Telescope, had to be temporarily shut down and placed in "safe mode." The shuttle, which was sent into orbit in 1990 as a joint venture between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), has been serving scientists all around the world for nearly two decades. However, the functions have since been suspended. As per NASA's official Twitter account, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) went into safe mode around 4:00 a.m. EST on Sunday due to an onboard software error. All research systems have been found to be functioning normally, and Hubble appears to be safe and stable, according to the space agency. Until further notice, the embargo will be enforced.

The Hubble Space Telescope, one of NASA's most prized assets, had to be temporarily shut down and placed in "safe mode" on March 8. For nearly two decades, the shuttle, which was sent into space in 1990 as a joint endeavor between NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), has served scientists all over the world. The duties, however, have been suspended since then. According to NASA's official Twitter account, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) went into safe mode around 4:00 a.m. EST on Sunday due to an onboard software error. Most other scientific object parts to be functioning normally, and Hubble is safe and stable,” the agency stated. The embargo will stay in place until further notice.

This isn't the first time the HST has been forced into protective mode. In 2018, a technical issue required the authorities involved to place the telescope in safe mode for a short time. The agency then went on to explain what safe mode is. It's a setup that allows the telescope to be in a "stable state that suspends science observations." It also refuels the HST by orienting its solar panels toward the sun, as it runs on solar energy. It will soon resume normal operation.

Since its ascent into orbit, the HST has been instrumental in numerous astronomical discoveries. It is the world's first major optical telescope to operate directly from space, providing an unobstructed view of the cosmos. It allows us to investigate not only our own solar system but even distant galaxies.